umbrakhaleesi:

inkdrocketgames:

I don’t know about you, but I have this weird feeling that female bodies tend to have have boobs*. Having boobs does not make sweaters sexualized.
Maybe I’m just weird.

*I dont mean every woman has them (and/or “sizeable” ones) and I’m talking about bodies not the gender you, or someone else, might acknowledge as.

I’m for equality in character representation as much as the next person but I get forever annoyed at people who make something out of nothing. The two outfits are the same.

Western society has some seriously fucked up ideas about breasts and bustiness.

(Source: inkdrocketgames, via lakobie)

subseed-parasect:

even if this wasn’t gender essentialism (i’m glad you can recognize that btw gold star 4 u) and misogyny and transphobia and also just the usual fanbrat “WHY CAN’T YOU DRAW AND WRITE CHARACTERS THE WAY I WANT YOU TO” entitlement
yes. those pesky women and their ridiculously inaccurate depictions of The Average Man. they are such a nuisance. unlike men, who always portray fictional women completely realistically and never use artistic license as an excuse to indulge their fetishes.

<sarcasm mode>What? Female-dominated fandoms frequently portraying male characters that male-dominated fandoms frequently portray female characters? Stop the presses! This is the story of the century!</sarcasm mode>
Also, Homestuck doesn’t really have any “average everydude” type character. John’s an amateur magician who’s into paranormal lore and really terrible movies. Dave’s an amateur photographer who uses a film camera and a darkroom, runs ironically humorous blogs, websites and social networking profiles and collects weird dead things preserved in various ways. Dirk makes puppets, robots, robo-puppets and smutty comics, he’s into philosophy, ancient civilizations and computer programming. Jake’s a dorky retro pulp gentleman adventurer.

subseed-parasect:

even if this wasn’t gender essentialism (i’m glad you can recognize that btw gold star 4 u) and misogyny and transphobia and also just the usual fanbrat “WHY CAN’T YOU DRAW AND WRITE CHARACTERS THE WAY I WANT YOU TO” entitlement

yes. those pesky women and their ridiculously inaccurate depictions of The Average Man. they are such a nuisance. unlike men, who always portray fictional women completely realistically and never use artistic license as an excuse to indulge their fetishes.

<sarcasm mode>What? Female-dominated fandoms frequently portraying male characters that male-dominated fandoms frequently portray female characters? Stop the presses! This is the story of the century!</sarcasm mode>

Also, Homestuck doesn’t really have any “average everydude” type character. John’s an amateur magician who’s into paranormal lore and really terrible movies. Dave’s an amateur photographer who uses a film camera and a darkroom, runs ironically humorous blogs, websites and social networking profiles and collects weird dead things preserved in various ways. Dirk makes puppets, robots, robo-puppets and smutty comics, he’s into philosophy, ancient civilizations and computer programming. Jake’s a dorky retro pulp gentleman adventurer.

(Source: unpopular-hs-opinions, via ssp-arch)

nightmares4lease:

lizawithazed:

beeftony:

This comic accurately sums up my feelings towards those who complain about The Hawkeye Initiative.

look, I am a huge David Willis fan. He is funny, brilliant, and bang on the mark.
But this? This is the single best and most important comic he has ever done and I am going to keep reblogging it until people stop making the argument in the first panel.

I bitch a lot about stupid things in the animation/comic world because that’s the field I’m going in to, and the MOST upsetting thing is the male versus female issue. I had a male teacher who (jokingly) told a male student that to change his character from male to female, all he had to do was add boobs and a butt. Now I know he was kidding. Which was why my rant was brief yet still wildly informative. But I’ve had other male teachers who seriously didn’t even want to look me in the eye because they’re so uncomfortable around females. 
My favorite treatment of the gender issue came from a teacher who legitimately kept forgetting to address me as a female, and saw me as one of the guys. He didn’t do it to be offensive, or because he thought guys were better, he just did it because he’s more used to dealing with dudes (animation is a pretty male-heavy field), and it actually made me feel more included. I’m not saying this is a good solution, but it’s sure as hell better than avoiding eye contact or tip-toeing around my feelings by carefully addressing the class as “gentlemen….and lady.” By treating it like it wasn’t an issue…by treating it like it didn’t matter what gender I was…there WAS no issue, and it felt more equal. 
But my least favorite moments (which are unfortunately quite common) are having to argue with all the dudes at my school because they just make sexy impractical women NOT because they know it will sell, but because they think it’s a good idea. They think adding armor is somehow empowering, and they think that long hair should always be worn down. They don’t see that what they’re creating is just a fantasy girlfriend, not a strong character. 
However, the very worst moment was in portfolio class a couple weeks ago, where I had to tell another girl (in game design) that her “brand” was too girly to ever get a job. To be fair, it DID look like it was a design for a 13 year old’s myspace page. The teachers (both of them) just sat there nodding in agreement (and even looked relieved that I was saying it, because they knew they couldn’t) as I told her that this is a male-dominant field. I told her about the recent(ish) issue with Aisha Tyler having to defend her “gamer” status despite doing the voices for the characters, and much more. I told her that guys in this field don’t give any credit to females, and if she wants a job, she sure as hell better not market herself as a girl, because she’s never going to be taken seriously. I told her I knew I sounded sexist, and that I knew there were exceptions. I told her that I hated it just as much as the next girl, but we’re the ones who have to deal with it while we try to change it. Fifteen other boys were in that room at that time. Her and one other girl besides myself were. That’s who I’ll be graduating with. It’s a super small school, there aren’t any others in our department (animation and game art) that will be graduating at the same time. Not one person in that entire room, teachers (both male) included, none of them tried to stop me. Not one of them said that what I told her was wrong. And when she looked like she was about to cry, not one person told her that I was exaggerating to make a point. They just told her that I was right. 
This industry is run by males, and made for males. There are a few companies that are specifically geared for women or children, but those are few and far between. So much so that I only know of one company that actually makes games for females that are GAMES not fitness or beauty/fashion shit. 
The comics, the animations, the movies in general, need a serious attitude adjustment when it comes to how females are handled. 
I’ve reblogged this comic before, and so many posts like it, and much like everyone before me, I’m not going to stop until this problem is not longer an issue. But I have a feeling that it’s not going to be fixed for a long, long time. 

*reblog*

nightmares4lease:

lizawithazed:

beeftony:

This comic accurately sums up my feelings towards those who complain about The Hawkeye Initiative.

look, I am a huge David Willis fan. He is funny, brilliant, and bang on the mark.

But this? This is the single best and most important comic he has ever done and I am going to keep reblogging it until people stop making the argument in the first panel.

I bitch a lot about stupid things in the animation/comic world because that’s the field I’m going in to, and the MOST upsetting thing is the male versus female issue. I had a male teacher who (jokingly) told a male student that to change his character from male to female, all he had to do was add boobs and a butt. Now I know he was kidding. Which was why my rant was brief yet still wildly informative. But I’ve had other male teachers who seriously didn’t even want to look me in the eye because they’re so uncomfortable around females. 

My favorite treatment of the gender issue came from a teacher who legitimately kept forgetting to address me as a female, and saw me as one of the guys. He didn’t do it to be offensive, or because he thought guys were better, he just did it because he’s more used to dealing with dudes (animation is a pretty male-heavy field), and it actually made me feel more included. I’m not saying this is a good solution, but it’s sure as hell better than avoiding eye contact or tip-toeing around my feelings by carefully addressing the class as “gentlemen….and lady.” By treating it like it wasn’t an issue…by treating it like it didn’t matter what gender I was…there WAS no issue, and it felt more equal. 

But my least favorite moments (which are unfortunately quite common) are having to argue with all the dudes at my school because they just make sexy impractical women NOT because they know it will sell, but because they think it’s a good idea. They think adding armor is somehow empowering, and they think that long hair should always be worn down. They don’t see that what they’re creating is just a fantasy girlfriend, not a strong character. 

However, the very worst moment was in portfolio class a couple weeks ago, where I had to tell another girl (in game design) that her “brand” was too girly to ever get a job. To be fair, it DID look like it was a design for a 13 year old’s myspace page. The teachers (both of them) just sat there nodding in agreement (and even looked relieved that I was saying it, because they knew they couldn’t) as I told her that this is a male-dominant field. I told her about the recent(ish) issue with Aisha Tyler having to defend her “gamer” status despite doing the voices for the characters, and much more. I told her that guys in this field don’t give any credit to females, and if she wants a job, she sure as hell better not market herself as a girl, because she’s never going to be taken seriously. I told her I knew I sounded sexist, and that I knew there were exceptions. I told her that I hated it just as much as the next girl, but we’re the ones who have to deal with it while we try to change it. Fifteen other boys were in that room at that time. Her and one other girl besides myself were. That’s who I’ll be graduating with. It’s a super small school, there aren’t any others in our department (animation and game art) that will be graduating at the same time. Not one person in that entire room, teachers (both male) included, none of them tried to stop me. Not one of them said that what I told her was wrong. And when she looked like she was about to cry, not one person told her that I was exaggerating to make a point. They just told her that I was right. 

This industry is run by males, and made for males. There are a few companies that are specifically geared for women or children, but those are few and far between. So much so that I only know of one company that actually makes games for females that are GAMES not fitness or beauty/fashion shit. 

The comics, the animations, the movies in general, need a serious attitude adjustment when it comes to how females are handled. 

I’ve reblogged this comic before, and so many posts like it, and much like everyone before me, I’m not going to stop until this problem is not longer an issue. But I have a feeling that it’s not going to be fixed for a long, long time. 

*reblog*

(via elidyce)

granolapaladin:

stfusexists:

Meanwhile in Finland…

…women in the military aren’t allowed to walk around their own barracks - where they LIVE - in a sports bra? Really? What year is it?

Seriously? In Scandinavia, the land of nude saunas and winter skinny dipping?

> Rebubble.

"When I started making those weird voices, a lot of people told me how whack it was,” she says, “‘What the fuck are you doing?’ they’d say. ‘Why do you sound like that? That doesn’t sound sexy to me.’ And then I started saying, Oh, that’s not sexy to you? Good. I’m going to do it more."

Nicki Minaj (BlackBook Magazine)

Yes, good. Being sexy should be a choice, not an obligation.

(Source: youwantsum, via meowgon)

"Women are expected to be nice and sweet, to make other people feel comfortable. A woman who says ‘hey, I think there’s a problem here’ is being ‘negative.’ A woman who doesn’t smile while she’s being harassed is ‘humourless.’ A woman who prefers to stay focused on tasks is a ‘cold bitch.’ Significant gendering is involved here; women have an obligation to look and act a certain way and when they don’t, they need to be hassled until they do."

Unknown (via grrl-meat)

i want to print this out and give this to my mother.

(via theoceanandthesky)

EVERYONE.

(via labia-saturation)

Frakkin’ sexist double standards. Frakkin’ gender policing. >_<

(Source: daughterofzami, via stfuconservatives)

"I think it is absolutely the responsibility of an artist to look into darkness without blinking. I think it is important that we talk about morality and character and the way we dehumanize one another. But I also think the point has been more than made on film that rape is a terrible thing, and at this point, if you’re not contributing some new idea to the conversation, then you are literally just using it as a button, something you push to get a response, and that unnerves me.

If I had to pinpoint what bothers me most about the subject, though, it’s that our ratings system in this country is so broken that a film that contains a sustained, brutal rape sequence featuring full-frontal female nudity can breeze right through with an R-rating, but if you include a sequence in which two people engage in spirited, consensual sex and we see anything that resembles reality, you are automatically flirting with an NC-17 or going out unrated. We have created a code of film language in which the single most destructive act of sexual violence is perfect acceptable to depict in the most graphic, clinical detail, but actual love-making has been all but banished from mainstream film."

Drew McWeeny (The Bigger Picture: What happens when we find The Line as viewers? - HitFix.com)

“I think it is absolutely the responsibility of an artist to look into darkness without blinking. “

Reblogging for the whole quote but also just for this.

(via creativityprocess)

this really hit home when i watched ‘this film is not yet rated,’ such a good documentary

(via meowgon)

Yeah, the MPAA has some seriously messed up rules.

(via meowgon)

"Queer people do not need to offer excuses or defend their own existence. If one could become queer by simply waking up one morning and deciding to become queer, for a day, for an hour, it wouldn’t change the fact that being queer is just as good, as valid, as worthy, as being straight. Providing straight people with reasons or excuses for our queerness simply confirms their suspicions that our sexuality really is their business and that we need to justify our existence to them. This allows heterosexists to continue to believe there is something superior about heterosexuality, and that being queer is a deviation from some kind of normal or default sexuality. There isn’t and it’s not.

We don’t need to justify ourselves to anyone. We don’t need a reason to be queer. Maybe we were born this way, maybe we weren’t. Maybe sexuality is fluid for some people and not for others. It’s totally irrelevant either way. The message we need to send to heterosexists is not that our sexuality was foisted upon us and that they should be “tolerant” and “understanding”. The message is: our sexuality is perfectly valid and none of your business, we offer you no excuses, and we are never going away."

» Fauxgress Watch: “Born This Way” Social Justice League (via sexisnottheenemy)

(via hulklinging)

"Slut-shaming collapses the complexity of another person onto a single dimension. But even more so, given how slut-shaming is used to control and shame all women regardless of their sexual practices or desires, it conflicts directly with respecting them. If you say that you respect women, then you need to respect all women, no matter how many sexual partners she has, her relationship choices, or how she enjoys sex. Otherwise, you’re saying that your respect is something that someone has to buy. I don’t think that that’s really respect at all."

If You Don’t Respect Sluts, You Don’t Respect Women, Charlie Glickman  (via transformfeminism)

(via stfuconservatives)

"Danica Patrick is such a.. pretty girl. She makes a lot of money and sponsorships because of it. But what’s not attractive is that she’s sexy and she knows it… Oh I’ve got a few words [to describe Patrick], it starts with a b, and it’s not beautiful… She always has a chip on her shoulder trying to prove something."

Fox 5 news anchor Ross Shimabuku, on Danica Patrick’s question to a report about why female athletes must always be described as “sexy,” and imploring him for another word to describe her.

Shimabuku was suspended today for a week without pay for his comments after he apologized… by admitting that he “gets nervous on the air” and has “TV anxiety.”

Video.

(via reallyfoxnews)

Today in casual sexism and shitty apologies. -Jess

(via stfuconservatives)

Wait… am I understanding this correctly, that a TV news anchor defended saying shitty sexist things on TV by saying he has “TV anxiety”? Did he actually say that? Because if he did, he doesn’t need to be suspended—he needs to be FUCKING FIRED, so he can pursue a career that doesn’t cause him so much anxiety that he just can’t help saying shitty sexist stuff on-air.

(via sprackraptor)

Wait, she’s sexy and she knows it and that makes her unattractive?  How does that even make sense?

(via byyourleave)

Wait, if he’s saying that it’s not attractive that she’s sexy and she knows it, doesn’t that mean he’s saying it would be attractive if she was sexy and didn’t know it? That seems pretty skeevy.

(via byyourleave)

"The sex drive of men is something we are all comfortable with in this country. It’s funny and hormonal and slapstick (American Pie), it’s potentially uncontrollable, maniacal/homicidal (American Psycho), it is adulterous and is insatiable (American Beauty), it is fun and social (American Graffiti) and it is entrepreneurial (American Gigolo). But women? No. NC-17. XXXX. Stop it with the moaning."

riese (via fuckyeahautostraddle)

Funny (read: fucking infuriating) thing about this: where female pleasure is generally a no-no, female pain is often viewed as less extreme. This skewed perception of female sexuality results in “Blue Valentine” being rated NC-17 because a woman is shown enjoying receiving oral sex, while “The Last House on the Left” and “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” come away with R-ratings, despite both having explicit rape scenes. 

So not only does our film culture limit female sexuality, but it limits it to the exact opposite of what anyone would hope sexuality to be: dark, shameful, violent, and only ever remotely pleasurable if orchestrated by a man - but never at the expense of the man’s own pleasure.

In “Blue Valentine”, Ryan Gosling gets Michelle Williams off, after all. We don’t see his character orgasm.

And, evidently, that’s far too threatening to the virility of men everywhere. 

(via michaelfassbendersteeth)

(via stfuconservatives)

sharonabot9000:

/leaves this here
/backs away slowly
/hides behind corner and grins

Every wonder how to convince guys that eroding sexist double standards and traditional gender roles is in their best interest?
IMO the chart should really mention bullying and homophobia.
And, for the record, most of those double standards weren&#8217;t invented by feminists, they are outgrowths of western patriarchal traditions, and most of them are primarily reinforced by guys, and guys are the ones who are going to need to be persuaded in order for mainstream western male culture to change.

sharonabot9000:

/leaves this here

/backs away slowly

/hides behind corner and grins

Every wonder how to convince guys that eroding sexist double standards and traditional gender roles is in their best interest?

IMO the chart should really mention bullying and homophobia.

And, for the record, most of those double standards weren’t invented by feminists, they are outgrowths of western patriarchal traditions, and most of them are primarily reinforced by guys, and guys are the ones who are going to need to be persuaded in order for mainstream western male culture to change.

(Source: damedonger)

IMO it&#8217;s shameful that women are still held to much stricter grooming standards than men. Guys generally haven&#8217;t been expected to wear makeup since powdered wigs went out of style.

IMO it’s shameful that women are still held to much stricter grooming standards than men. Guys generally haven’t been expected to wear makeup since powdered wigs went out of style.

(via thislousytshirt)

crustaceagenomn:

fuckyeahgladosandchell:

At school today, this group of girls who are utterly fascinated with my homosexuality had to grab my breasts so hard that I was lucky I didn’t bruise.

Although I find roughness attractive, that’s not just for any girl. Straight girls don’t like it, gay girls don’t like it. No one likes it when strangers touch them.

Sorry, I just had to rant a little. This is no where near the first time it’s happened.

wow wtf rude assholes, i’d stomp the shit out of their breasts HOW’S THAT BITCH? OH I THOUGHT YOU LIKED IT ROUGH

Disgusting. If the administrators aren’t taking this seriously, you should ask them how they’d handle the situation if it was a bunch of guys. They shouldn’t be allowed to use their gender to get away with sexual harassment.

(via crownthedogs)